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Social welfare with indigenous peoples / edited by John Dixon and Robert P. Scheurell.

Nomor Panggil e20342069
Pengarang lain/Kontributor
Subjek
Penerbitan [Place of publication not identified]: Routledge, , 1995
 Abstrak
In many areas of the world, there has been an earlier indigenous population, which has been conquered by a more recent population group. In Social Welfare with Indigenous Peoples, the editors and contributors examine the treatment of many indigenous populations from five continental areas: Africa (Sierra Leone, Zimbabwe); Australasia, New Zealand; Central and South America (Brazil, Mexico); Europe (Scandinavia, Spain) and North America.
They found that, regardless of whether the newer immigrants became the majority population, as in North America, or the minority population, such as in Africa, there were many similarities in how the indigenous peoples were treated and in their current situations. This treatment is examined from many perspectives: political subjugation; negligence; shifting focus of social policy; social and legal discrimination; provision of social services; and ethnic, cultural and political rejuvenation.
 File Digital: 1
Shelf
 SOCIAL WELFARE Social Welfare with Indigenous Peoples Comparative Social Welfare Series, John Dixon 1994.pdf ::
 Info Lainnya
Physicsnone
Typenone
Formatnone
Languageeng
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e20342069 TERSEDIA
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In many areas of the world, there has been an earlier indigenous population, which has been conquered by a more recent population group. In Social Welfare with Indigenous Peoples, the editors and contributors examine the treatment of many indigenous populations from five continental areas: Africa (Sierra Leone, Zimbabwe); Australasia, New Zealand; Central and South America (Brazil, Mexico); Europe (Scandinavia, Spain) and North America.
They found that, regardless of whether the newer immigrants became the majority population, as in North America, or the minority population, such as in Africa, there were many similarities in how the indigenous peoples were treated and in their current situations. This treatment is examined from many perspectives: political subjugation; negligence; shifting focus of social policy; social and legal discrimination; provision of social services; and ethnic, cultural and political rejuvenation.